Have a recipe to contribute? Add it to the Tacofancy Project on Github!

Slow-Cooked Salsa Verde Chicken with Green Chile Cabbage Salad, garnished with Simple Salsa Verde topped off with Zaatar and wrapped in delicious Fresh Corn Tortillas

Get another Taco

Contributed by Brian Mount, sinker, Jake Spurlock, katiepark
Slow-Cooked Salsa Verde Chicken =============================== Low-effort, delicious shredded chicken based off [this recipe](http://www.skinnytaste.com/2013/04/easiest-crock-pot-salsa-verde-chicken.html). To minimize prep time, just toss in a jar of storebought salsa verde. * 2 lbs skinless chicken breasts * 2 cups salsa verde * 1 tsp minced garlic or 1/4 tsp garlic powder * Pinch of Oregano _(Note: I ran out of Oregano, but the recipe still tastes great without it.)_ * Pinch of Cumin * Salt, to taste Add chicken to slow cooker and season with garlic, oregano, cumin and salt. Pour salsa verde over everything, cover and cook for two hours on high. Once that's ready, shred chicken. Give it another stir to cover everything in sauce, then serve.
Contributed by sinker, Ross Donaldson
### Green Chile Cabbage Salad with Seared Corn This isn't a tradition, or even particularly traditional -- except in my apartment in Oakland, where I make this for myself ever time I make pork tacos. #### Ingredients * 1 green cabbage * 4 limes * 2 ears corn, or roughly two cups of corn kernels (adjust to desired corn-y-ness) * Dried, Powdered New Mexico Green Chile, to taste * Salt, to taste * Olive oil * Optional: some crumbled cotija or queso Oaxaqueno #### Directions 1. If using ears of corn, strip the kernels from them with a sharp knife. 2. Heat a few tablespoons of oil over high heat. I like to use a Dutch Oven for this, but the main cookware properties you want are heavy-bottomed and wide. 3. Toss the corn kernels in to the oil, spread them evenly, salt very lightly and let them ride. I _highly_ recommend a splatter guard for this step, but **not** a lid. You want the corn to dry out just a little and get a good sear. It's done when it's starting to get dark, a little chewy, and probably is sticking to the pan. 4. While the corn is going, core and chop the cabbage in to wide strips. 5. How's the corn doing? 6. Juice the limes. 7. How's the corn doing? If it's not done yet, grab a beer and hang out 'til it is. 8. The corn is done? Great. Toss it on top of the cabbage. Add a little salt, then a good hit of olive oil, then half-or-so of the lime juice. Toss in a good tablespoon or two of the green chile powder. Start stirring. 9. You want everything coated nicely, but I don't like the salad too oily, so go easy on that. I add lime until the sour balances the sweet of the corn. I add green chile slowly -- it takes a second to rehydrate and get hot. I might add as much as a half cup of the stuff to a salad for myself or spicy food fans like me; I go easier on the spice-unenthused. 10. Serve it! If you're in to tossing a little cheese on there, do it -- but I usually just eat it straight. Sometimes this goes on fish or chicken tacos; sometimes it's a side to richer pork tacos. It's always awesome. **Note on ingredients**: green chile is the gastronomical life blood of New Mexican cuisine, but it's little known in the other 49 states. I like a brand called [_Los Chileros de Nuevo Mexico_](http://www.loschileros.com/), which I can find sometimes in tiendas and other times at Whole Foods (go figure). The trick here is this: just don't accept substitutes. It's not the same. I've also had to accept that fresh chile is just not what this salad needs, so don't do that either (it doesn't distribute well enough across the cabbage). Do have this with cold, crisp beer. tags: vegetarian, vegan
Contributed by Brian Mount, sinker, Jake Spurlock, Ryan Pitts
Simple Salsa Verde ================== I got this base recipe from a vegan friend. If you can't find one of these peppers, swap in another one! * 6 Average-sized tomatillos * 1 Poblano pepper * 1 Serrano pepper * 1 Jalapeno pepper * 1 Sweet red pepper * Juice of 1 or 2 fresh-squeezed limes (to taste) * Pinch or two kosher salt (to taste) You're in charge of the heat here. For a milder salsa, remove all the ribs and seeds inside the peppers. For medium, leave in a few ribs, and for hot, go nuts. Rough chop the peppers and tomatillos, then throw into a blender or food processor with salt and lime juice. Pulse to desired consistency. As with most salsas, this will taste better if you let it sit in the fridge for a few hours before eating. It's great on chips or drizzled over steak or pork tacos. tags: vegetarian, vegan
Contributed by Brian Mount, sinker, Jake Spurlock, Charlie Loyd
Zaatar ====== _A.k.a. za‘tar, za’atar, zattr, etc._ Zaatar is a thyme-based Middle Eastern seasoning that adapts well to tacos. It has a pleasantly dry, faintly sour/bitter flavor. It goes well on savory bases like squash and lamb, and combines with other sour seasonings like lemon juice and radish. There are many kinds of zaatar, some quite different; this recipe is representative, not definitive. * 4 units thyme * 2 units oregano * 2 units sesame seeds * 0–1 unit salt * 1 unit sumac (to be found at a Lebanese or Syrian market, or at a yuppie grocery; in a pinch, lemon zest can substitute) * Other herbs to taste: fennel pollen, marjoram, cumin, etc. * Optional: trace olive oil or lemon juice as a binder (but not if you plan to store it) Toast the sesame seeds. Grind all ingredients together using any method, stopping when the mixture is not too fine to pick up by pinching. May be added to meat during cooking, or sprinkled over a finshied taco. The latest theories have not ruled out the possibility of a zaatar mole. tags: vegetarian, vegan
Contributed by Brian Mount, sinker, Tim Murtaugh, OpenShift guest, AhemNason, Tim Murtaugh
Fresh Corn Tortillas =================== This is the only way to go. So worth it. Makes roughly 15 tortillas. * 1 3/4 cups masa harina * 1 1/8 cups water 1. In a medium bowl, mix together masa harina and hot water until thoroughly combined. Turn dough onto a clean surface and knead until pliable and smooth. If dough is too sticky, add more masa harina; if it begins to dry out, sprinkle with water. Cover dough tightly with plastic wrap and allow to stand for 30 minutes. 2. Preheat a cast iron skillet or griddle to medium-high. 3. Divide dough into 15 equal-size balls. Using a tortilla press (or a rolling pin), press each ball of dough flat between two sheets of wax paper (plastic wrap or a freezer bag cut into halves will also work). 4. Place tortilla in preheated pan and allow to cook for approximately 30 seconds, or until browned and slightly puffy. Turn tortilla over to brown on second side for approximately 30 seconds more, then transfer to a plate. Repeat process with each ball of dough. Keep tortillas covered with a towel to stay warm and moist (or a low temp oven) until ready to serve. tags: vegetarian, vegan